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The Recruiter's Digest
 Recruiting News, Training & Commentary by Bill Radin

June, 2006

Recruiting Scripts Made Easy

(Warning: This article contains subliminal messages)

A few years ago, I completely re-tooled my recruiting script. Instead of paraphrasing the job description (dull and boring), I began to tell stories about the company's unique problems, and how the right person might solve them (interesting and engaging).

Sure, I could have blathered on about the job's technical requirements (unrealistic), the salary (average) or my client's mission statement (who cares). But then, I would sound just like all the other recruiters in the world (telemarketer at dinnertime).

I wanted to get people excited whenever I pitched a job. With a more powerful presentation, I figured I could do a better job of stimulating interest and generating referrals. And in the process, I'd build my professional reputation (and make more money).

So, I came up with a novel concept: Why not stop torturing innocent candidates with dry facts and figures, and make recruiting calls a lot more fun?

We All Love Stories
It's human nature, and it starts in our infancy, when mommy or daddy tucked us in with Mother Goose. A good story not only entertains us and grabs our attention; a good story can also help teach a lesson, prove a point or communicate an idea.

Unfortunately, a typical job description (blah, blah, blah) does very little to reveal the "back story" that led to the job's creation in the first place. But by probing for details and by using a little imagination, you can
paint a more vivid picture in the mind of your candidates and put some top-spin on your presentation.  

To convert facts into word pictures, try using a template like this to storyboard your recruiting script:

"Hi, my name is                 , and I'm a recruiter specializing in                 . I'm working on an interesting assignment that I want to discuss with you. Is this a good time to talk? Great.
"The job is with a company that       ___           , and they need to hire someone to                  so that they can                               .
"It's especially important that the new hire can                      ; otherwise the company will find themselves in a situation in which                    .
"However, if we can find the right person, it will not only mean                  for the company, it could very well represent                  for you. Is this something you might be interested in?"

Putting It Into Practice
And here's how I filled in the blanks, based on what my client told me about his company's problem:

"Hi, my name is Bill Radin, and I'm a recruiter in the instrumentation market. I'm working on an interesting assignment that I want to discuss with you. Is this a good time to talk? Great.
"The job is with a company that makes control panels for luxury yachts and off-road vehicles, and they need to hire someone to run their engineering department so they can bring new, innovative products to the market.
"It's especially important that the new hire can act as a bridge between the people in sales and the people in engineering, otherwise the company will find themselves in a situation in which the two different groups will continually fight to protect their own turf, to the point of paralyzing the company."
"However, if we can find a technical person who has strong diplomatic skills, it will not only bring peace and prosperity to the company, it could very well represent an important and visible leadership role for you. Is this something you might be interested in?"

Scripting your presentation is not only fun, it forces you to pay attention to what you're saying—and to what the other person will be hearing. Of course, you'll want to tailor your style to match your market.

I've learned that if I can get a candidate's attention by telling an interesting story (Gotcha!), the rest will fall into place. And as a result, I'll fill a ton of jobs and keep my clients happy. (They love me! They really love me!).

 

 
 


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